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Emile Henry Bakeware Reviews

Emile Henry Bakeware is one of the few bakeware that is still made in France. While other manufacturer offshore their manufacturing to Thailand or China, Emile Henry still proudly make it in France. This lets them control the quality and finish of their product. Not only that, Emile Henry has been making bake ware for over a hundred years. One of their most iconic bake ware is the ruffled pie dish. However, the question is whether its better than other brands? What about those made in China? This review will take a closer look at the design and feature of Emile Henry Bake Ware.


Emile Henry Dutch Oven Review Quick Summary

Categories
Emile Henry Dutch Oven
PerformanceGreat
ColorsWide Variety of Color
Brand AwarenessWorld Famous
CapacityVarious Sizes
Country of ManufacturerFrance
ThoughtsOne of the few bakeware that is still made in France. They have some of the most beautiful colors I have ever seen. My favorite are the brown and green. The only issue is the small handle. However, almost all bakeware have that same issue. If you are looking for a quality bakware, Emile Henry is the way to go.
Reviewed CookwareEmile Henry Flame Round Stewpot Dutch Oven, 7 Quart, Burgundy

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History of Emile Henry

Emile Henry was founded by Jacques Henry in 1870. In his factory, he led a company of 20. As time went on, his family took over the company. Their product soon reached Paris and it was a huge success. As they expanded so did their product. One notable change was the addition of different colors. It was a breakthrough for them and it increased sales. Fast forward a few years, they started to expand to other innovation such as the Flame Ceramic. It was one of the few clay product that can be used directly on the Flame. Another innovation was the Bread Cloche. A clay pot designed to help bake bread. Today, they are one of the biggest bakeware manufacturer in the world.

Emile Henry Bakeware Design

This section will discuss the design and construction of Emile Henry Bakeware. We will go over handle, construction and overall performance.

Handle

While Emile Henry is not the only one guilty of this, the handle on the bakeware tends to be pretty horrible. They are small and you risk the chance of it slipping and break. For whatever reason, almost all manufacturer like to just make little tabs. For smaller dishes, its fine. You can hold it from the base. However, for heavier things like dutch oven or soup bowls. Good luck getting a firm grip. The last thing you want is to drop your hard work on the floor.

Shape

The shape of the bakeware is wide and varied. You can basically get any shape you want. I personally find the shape of the ruffled pie dish to look odd, but taste differs. What I do love is their casserole dish. It has a certain handmade charm to it. It does not look perfect like a machine made, but something that an artisan created.

Their bread cloche are also beautifully well done. From baguettes to roastes, they are simply amazing. Although it is quite expensive. Nevertheless, you should be able to find one that suits your need.

Color

I cant imagine Emile Henry without the colors that they have. They are some of the most beautiful hues I have ever seen. My favorite one is the beautiful forest green color that they have. Another great color would be their toffee brown. Although arguably their most iconic is the burgundy red one. I am actually quite surprised that it took them until 1986 to incorporate more color to their bakeware. I wonder what color it was before then.

These colors have a glaze on top to make it shine. However, this glaze can be scratched and nicked. I recommend that you take great care when handling it. This will also protect the fragile nature of the dish. The bottom is left unglazed and you can fee the sandy texture of it. I wonder if it was done that way to improve heat absorption.

Durability

Durability is the biggest issue of any clayware. While they are nice, if you manage to smack it wrong, it will crack and shatter. According to their website, theirs are resistance to mechanical shock. In their flame cookware video, you can watch a worker drop a metal pole on the bakeware. This supposedly test how strong it is. You can watch the video below.

Another claim is that it is resistance to thermal shock. This is when you shock it from hot to cold. It usually occurs when you remove the product from the oven and set it on the table. If it does not resists thermal shock, it will crack.

Finally, its the color fading. UV light and washing can sometimes remove the dye of the color. Since they have a glaze, it will resist that.

Me personally, I believe the thermal shock and the color fading. The mechanical shock one not so much. You do not want to get overly comfortable with it. I would baby it like I would glass. The last thing you want is for it to crack. Especially considering the price.

Le Creuset vs Emile Henry Stoneware

I find that the Emile Henry stoneware to be more handmade. You see a lot of the flaws and issues. This gives its charm. However, the Le Creuset is a lot more refined and well made. You hardly see any issues with it. This makes me wonder if most of it was done via machine. Aside from that, they are both of decent weight and should hold heat relatively well. Le Creuset stoneware is usually made in Thailand though. Emile Henry is still made in France. It really comes down to preference. I personally find the colors on some of Emile Henry to be more attractive.

Emile Henry Bakeware Thoughts

Emile Henry Bakeware is pretty good. Aside from the handle, it is everything you want from a stoneware. It has decent heft, the colors are fantastic and its resistant to thermal shock. Although it is a little expensive, what are you gonna do? Anything made in France tends to be overpriced. Le Creuset is made a little better but theirs are made in Thailand. Whichever you choose, they’re all good choice. I would just get what you think looks better.

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I hope you like this Emile Henry Bakeware review, If you would like to see more, please visit our Pots and Pans Review page.

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