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John Boos Cutting Board Reviews

John Boos Cutting Board are one of the best cutting board that America has to offer. They offer a wide variety of cutting blocks from butcher table to even kitchen trolly. However, the prices that they tend to ask for these tables tend to be astronomical. What makes it even more confusing is all the different configuration and options available. As a new shopper, it can be a little daunting. This review will take a closer look at what all these different configuration and design mean. Hopefully, this will help you make a better decision on what to get.

John Boos Cutting Board Review Quick Summary

Categories
John Boos Cutting Board
PerformanceGreat
Country of ManufacturerUSA
WoodHard Maple
Janka Scale Hardness1450
Brand AwarenessAmerica
Warranty1 Year
Recommended Size20 x 15 x 2.25
ThoughtsA heavy duty board that can last a lifetime. Just be aware, that they take a little more work than your standard plastic cutting board. If you can, I recommend looking into buying a table from Boos.
Reviewed CookwareJohn Boos Block RA02-GRV Maple Wood Edge Grain Reversible Cutting Board with Juice Moat, 20 Inches x 15 Inches x 2.25 Inches


History of John Boos

John Boos was founded in 1887 by Conrad Boos. Their first sawmill was at Effinham, Il where they still make their product. The first product that Conrad made was a Sycamore tree with three legs on the bottom. Originally it was designed for a blacksmith to use but a butcher saw potential as a cutting block. Conrad son, John decided to modify the block for the butcher.

Soon after, the Boo’s family sold their company to German immigrant Adelbert Gravenhorst. From there, he slowly grew the company. Even despite the great depression, the company flourished. They offered products through the war and expanded their product line. Today, Boos Block are known as the go to choice for kitchen cutting block. They provide products to both commercial and domestic use. Their blocks are one of the most iconic in America’s History.

John Boos Cutting Board Design

This section will discuss the various aspect of John Boo’s Cutting board. We will talk about thickness, wood, construction and overall performance.

Wood

Most of the Boo’s product uses American Hard Maple wood for their cutting board. On the Janka Scale it has a rating of 1450. Relatively hard but not hard enough to damage your knife nor nick the board. While it might seem like softer boards might be more gentle on your knife. Overtime, these nicks and cuts will dull your knife faster. Among wood makers, hard maple is the go to choice for cutting board.

Another benefit of maple is that it is NSF certified. They inhibit the growth of bacteria making it safe for a professional kitchen. If for some reason it starts growing mold, a simple salt and lemon solution should kill off any bacteria.

Edge Grain vs End Grain

Boos board have two very popular configuration, Edge Grain and End Grain. You can think of edge grain as the side of the wood. When manufacturer make these board, they would stack them row by row. For end grain, they use the top of the board and cut and glue them together. Overall, this process is more laborious and they generally cost more. Collectors and cutting board aficionado love these boards as they believe that they are more gentle on the knife. However, these boards tends to have more issue than the edge grain.

For starter, end grain will absorb more moisture than edge grain due to its porous nature. What this means is that when you wash it, the wood will expand and contract more than a edge grain. This contraction will lead to a degradation in its structural integrity causing it to split faster. If you ever split a block of wood before, than you should know that splitting it from the top is the fastest. Not only that, they also tend to absorb more oil than edge grain.

Realistically, while there might be marginal performance benefit from end grain board. The reality is that most home user will not notice any difference. I personally would like either one, but really I am more focused on the price of the board.

Handle

There are a variety of different handle option on the board. Some have metal handle other have notches on the side. I personally like the one with notches on the side. They take up less space and wont accidentally cut your hand. I personally would avoid any boards without handle as those will be very difficult to lift off the counter top. Boards with feet are a good alternative but that also limits your cutting surface. These boards only have one side as opposed to two.

Best Cutting Board Size

I personally like my board to be around 20 x 15 inch in size. this gives me enough room to move food around and still cut. It also accommodates larger knife and lets me cut without running out of space. But you should really measure what space you have at home. Find something that fits your table and make sure it fits your sink. The last thing you want to do is to have a board that you cannot even wash.

Thickness

Thickness of a cutting board is also important. While Boos Cutting board offer a wide variety of thickness, I recommend something that is at least 2 inch. Thicker board means that it is less likely to warp and split. They also tend to stay in place longer and you get overall better durability. If anything should happen to the board, you can also sand a portion of it off. Even though there is an added cost to the thicker board, the benefit far outweighs the con.

For those of you who do not like the weight of thicker boards, you can go lighter. Just be sure to put a towel underneath it so that it wont move around. It might not last as long though.

Caring for John Boos Cutting Board

Cutting boards requires a little more maintenance than a plastic board. For starter, you cannot stick them in a dishwasher nor can you soak them. After you wash it, you need to ensure it has enough room so that it can dry properly. Nothing doing so will cause the wood to expand and crack. Not only that, by keeping the board damp, the glue used to hold the board together can dissolve. What this means is that you will have crack on your board.

There are things that you can do to reduce it. For starter, you should oil the board if it seems dry. A board that is relatively oiled should be able to repel moisture better and last longer. I recommend that you either use a cream or mineral oil. I personally use mineral oil as those are a lot more affordable.

Cutting Board or Tables?

I personally have both boards and tables by John Boos. I love them both, but really all you need is a cutting board. Unless you have the space or a kitchen professional, a butcher block is not necessary. However, if you do not even have a table, then a table would make a huge difference in your kitchen. I found their product to be really well made and solid. It is quite a difference from your Ikea stuff. Just be aware, that this quality comes at a price and weight. You will be surprised that these tables can weigh 300 plus pound. I am not even joking about this.

John Boos Cutting Board Thoughts

Overall, John Boos cutting board are held to a higher standard. They source good quality wood and in general have great build quality. Having said that, they are not indestructable and they are a little bit high maintenance. However, if you treat it right and take care of it. It should last a lifetime. If you can, try to get one of their tables. They are simply amazing!


I hope you enjoyed this John Boos Cutting Board Review. If you would like to see more, please visit our Cutlery page.

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